watch my toast. Fayetteville
newyorker:

Amy Davidson on Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s retirement dissent:

"Do Democrats want to make sure that a President of their party is in office when Ginsburg leaves the Court? Then win the next election; battle it out, rather than fretting and sighing about how an older woman doesn’t know when it’s time to go.”


Photograph by Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post via Getty

newyorker:

Amy Davidson on Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s retirement dissent:

"Do Democrats want to make sure that a President of their party is in office when Ginsburg leaves the Court? Then win the next election; battle it out, rather than fretting and sighing about how an older woman doesn’t know when it’s time to go.”

Photograph by Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post via Getty

An August 2011 survey by the Center for Talent Innovation found that 61 percent of women ages 33 to 47 without kids believe that their parent colleagues receive more flexibility at work. While businesses are increasingly sensitive to helping parents manage their time, they still assume, says DePaulo, that “single people don’t have lives. No life means no need for balance—when, of course, everyone has important obligations, whether it’s a class, exercise, caring for an elderly family member, or taking a vacation.” Corporate lawyer Mary Mathis says she worries that her life 10 years from now will look exactly like it does now: “My coworker with kids leaves early twice a week, but I work from 9 to 7 in the office every day, another hour at home, and throughout the weekend,” says the 30-year-old from Plainfield, New Jersey. “No one has ever directly said this to me, but when late nights or extra projects come up, it’s clear the thinking is, She’s single, she has time to do this.

The Single Girl’s Second Shift - Marie Claire

I’ve been reading some pretty fascinating stuff about this issue tonight. (I began with this one.) I’m a fairly chipper person and am usually more than happy to help out but I dread basketball season. As the only single, childless person in our building I can almost promise you I’m usually the first one people ask to cover them at the last minute when something else comes up.

(via apsies)

(via apsies)

An earlier version of this post said that there is only one person of color on The Times’s staff of critics. There are two.

CORRECTION on New York Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan’s piece addressing a racist critique of TV producer Shonda Rhimes.  

The original article, published in the paper Sept. 18th and written by the decidedly white Alessandra Stanley, opened with these words: "When Shonda Rhimes writes her autobiography, it should be called ‘How to Get Away With Being An Angry Black Woman.’"

Sullivan called Stanley’s piece “condescending” and “astonishingly tone-deaf and out of touch.”  And precisely zero people familiar with Stanley’s error-prone work are surprised.

(via inothernews)

sixpenceee:

Tim Burton Inspired Pokemon Drawing by Vaughn Pinpin (More Images)

(via mashable)

(Source: dapperfucker, via wrists)

Needing to have reality confirmed and experience enhanced by photographs is an aesthetic consumerism to which everyone is now addicted. Industrial societies turn their citizens into image-junkies; it is the most irresistible form of mental pollution.

Susan Sontag, On Photography

Lensblr Quote of the Day

(via lensblr-network)
Stakeholders are backpedaling on previous estimates and are now saying that the backlash against ‘literally’ will occur before the end of 2014. We’ll need all hands on deck once everything becomes ‘figuratively the best’ and people ‘figuratively can’t even.’
Cathy Lew predicts trends that are poised for a comeback. (via newyorker)
“And I urge you to please notice when you are happy, and exclaim or murmur or think at some point, ‘If this isn’t nice, I don’t know what is.’” — Kurt Vonnegut, A Man Without a Country